Knox Thames:    Sure.  The commission is headed by nine commissioners which three are appointed by the president and the other six by the congress.  It’s done in a way that party of the president will have the majority of seats on the commission.  These commissioners are private US citizens, they’re not paid to serve as commissioners.  I’m a US government employee, I’m full time but our commissioners are not.  They come from a variety of backgrounds and faiths.  Our current chair is a Jewish activist.  We have a Muslim Imam from Boston.  Variety of Christian denominations represented, we’ve had catholic bishops, a Bahai.  So a real, you know, I think the commissioners reflected diversity of the United States and they guide our work.  And the report comes out under their name and they’re involved in, looking at the recommendations that the staff come up with and there are principles.  So, they are the ones that are meeting with Secretary Clinton, hopefully we’ll be meeting with her next month and other government leaders both the United States and elsewhere.  As far as our methodology, the State Department has the benefit of having embassies and every country in the world and the way that the religious freedom reports and its sister report, the human rights report, work is that the drafts start in our embassies.  So saying, Dushanbe, Tajikistan there’s a human rights officer there, who is collecting information year-round on religious freedom, on freedom of speech and democratization to feed in today’s reports and he will put together the first draft of the religious freedom report and then ship it to Washington where the experts in the office of international religious freedom will then add to it, make changes being in conversation about, you know, why did you put this in, why did you not put this other incident and have that negotiation and then it goes to through the clearance process inside the State Department.  And that covers every country in the world and is a July to June cycle.  Like I said earlier, our report is more focused and that we’re looking at the worst of the worse and while the State Department report documents, it doesn’t make recommendations.  So that’s one important distinction, our report does some documentation but also has extensive recommendations for what US policy should be promoting, and I think that’s the value that we add into thinking about what does United States seem to be doing to more effectively promote this human right…

Interviewer:    Any questions [IB], yes.

Man1:    I want to know of your findings about…

Interviewer:    Stand up please.

Man1:    [IB], George Washington University.  I want to learn your findings about Alevis in Turkey and do you have any recommendations about that issue to the government or related insufficiency in Turkey.

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